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‘Blair Witch’ Film Makers Talk Possible Third Movie
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Blair Witch

A third movie in The Blair Witch Project series is no big shocking developing news story — since the first movie was made, there was always word that a sequel would follow, and then a prequel would be made that was set a couple centuries ago and that would tell the real tale of the witch. After the second movie came out and was hated by most, the third chapter seemed to completely disappear. It’s popped up from time to time, but nothing has ever come of it.

While speaking to the BBC, film makers Eduardo Sanchez and Daniel Myrick chatted all things Blair Witch, including what the eternally-coming third movie they’re still developing might include, if it ever does get made, of course.

It appears that the current problem in the way of this project is what exactly to do with it. Sanchez and Myrick acknowledge the prequel idea set in the 1700s, but sound like they don’t want to do that anymore.

Ideally, each Blair Witch film would be a completely different kind of movie. We’ve thought about doing a film that takes place in the late 1700s and looks like a [Stanley] Kubrick movie with gritty looking people and lighting.

But now, we’re thinking about going back and and seeing what happened directly after the first film finished.

I think it will have some kind of video element in it, but it won’t be a first person hand-held movie.

Fairly cryptic overall. I’m a big fan of the original, so I’d love to see what these two came up with for another movie. Everyone else is “rebooting,” so why not the witch of all witches (if she even exists) herself? If I had a choice, I’d opt for the 1700s prequel tale, because if done right, that could be a really cool movie to see.

The original movie only cost $100,000 to make and turned in over $250 Million in box office numbers. This is one of the best profits in the history of cinema. It was shot in ten days and the three main characters (using their real names) Heather Donahue, Joshua Leonard, and Mike Williams were taught how to shoot the scenes as well as improvise to make it as authentic as possible. The technique worked. Not everyone fell for it, but most people who still love the movie to this day (myself included) were first baited by the MISSING poster seen above, and a simple trailer leading one to believe that some footage from this expedition had actually been found out in the woods. This paired with all three actors doing unbelievable jobs NOT appearing to be acting, but reacting as any human being in that situation would react.

The duo states that they wanted to let the chaos die down a bit before moving into a sequel, but the studios — being studios and all — wanted to “strike while the iron was hot” and went ahead with it on their own. And now you know why the second movie was so terrible.

What do you guys think; would you see a new Blair Witch Project if it was done properly?

[Source: via /Film]

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