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Comic Review: Justice League Of America, Volume 1: World’s Most Dangerous
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Waerloga69   |  @   |  
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Justice League Of America, Volume 1: World's Most DangerousJustice League Of America, Volume 1
World’s Most Dangerous
Hardcover | Paperback | Kindle
Written by Geoff Johns
Pencils by David Finch
Inks by David Finch
Color by Sonia Oback and Jeromy Cox
Letters by Rob Leigh
Cover by David Finch
DC Comics
Release Date: November 12, 2013
Cover Price: $24.99

Who do you call if the world’s greatest heroes go bad? That’s the question that Director Amanda Waller poses to Colonel Steve Trevor in the first few pages of Justice League Of America, Volume 1: World’s Most Dangerous. Deciding to build a response team is easy enough, but filling the roster is something far more difficult.

Kicking things off, they start the list off with Hawkman (one of my favorite of the DC Comics bunch) who is known for his brutality as much as for his moral code. The next addition is Katana, whose sword is far more than just steel. Next up they bring in Vibe, a hero that we haven’t heard about in decades (this version is a reboot, not the original one from yesteryear). Curiously, Waller insists adding Stargirl and her powerful Cosmic Staff, though not quite in the capacity you might think. The true powerhouse of this team is the always adaptable Martian Manhunter, though getting him on the team was more than a little work. To keep things balanced, Waller also has the new Green Lantern and Green Arrow on the team roster. But Trevor has an addition of his own, the always dangerous Catwoman. Not to be a public member of the team, she is intended for the behind the scenes and under the table jobs that pop up.

...continue reading »
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Comic Review: Rocketeer Adventures 2 #1
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PS Hayes   |  @   |  
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Rocketeer Adventures 2Rocketeer Adventures 2 #1
Written by Marc Gugenheim, Peter David, Stan Sakai
Art by Sandy Plunkett, Bill Sienkiewicz, Stan Sakai, and Arthur Adams
Colors by Jeromy Cox, Dave Stewart, and John Raunch
Letters by Robbie Robbins, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Stan Sakai
Rocketeer Created by Dave Stevens
Design by Chris Mowry
Covers by Darwyn Cooke and Dave Stevens
IDW Publishing
Release Date: March 21, 2012
Cover Price: $3.99

There’s days when I love comics and then there’s days when I LOVE comics. Reading Rocketeer Adventures 2 #1 made me glad that out of all the hobbies or passions in the world, that mine is comic books. From start to finish, this book is one of the highest quality works I’ve read in a long time.

There’s three stories in this issue: Marc Guggenheim, Peter David, and Stan Sakai all tell wonderfully charming stories of the late Dave Steven‘s Rocketeer. While all three are good, Stan Sakai’s is my favorite. There’s a great innocence to it and a fantastic ending that will leave you smiling. Speaking of smiling, Peter David’s story will have you grinning from ear to ear. It’s an all out parody of our hero and very entertaining from start to finish. Marc Guggenheim’s story is the first of the issue and I think it’s meant to be the “heavy” of the issue. While I liked it, I really felt that I was being covertly preached to.

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Comic Review: Key of Z #4
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Hunter Camp   |  
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Key of Z #4Key of Z #4
Written by Claudio Sanchez and Chondra Echert
Art by Aaron Kuder
Colors by Charlie Kirchoff
Letters by Johnny Lowe
Cover by Nathan Fox and Jeromy Cox
Evil Ink Comics/BOOM! Studios
Release Date: January 25, 2012
Cover Price: $3.99

I’ve read a lot of zombie-themed comic books, but I can honestly say that I’ve never read one quite like Key of Z, and I’m going to tell you right now, from the first issue to the last issue, this series is fantastic.

I’ve been following the creation of the series since 2010 when creators Claudio Sanchez and Chondra Echert first announced that they would be working on a zombie comic that would take place in New York City and encompass a lot of specifics from the area under the working title Subway Seriez, which is still used as the subtitle for Key of Z, as evidenced by the cover of issue three.

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Comic Review: Danger Girl: Revolver #1
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RoughJustice   |  
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Danger Girl: Revolver #1Danger Girl: Revolver #1
Written by Andy Hartnell
Art by Chris Madden
Colors by Jeromy Cox
IDW Publishing
Release Date: January 18, 2012
Cover Price: $3.99

Andy Hartnell brings the girls back in Danger Girl: Revolver #1. Like most comics in the action-spy genre this issue paid homage to the movies, comics, and novels that have defined the spy franchise. Instead of the sleek, classy, and cool agent, Hartnell re-introduces readers to his impossibly proportioned heroines. Danger Girl: Revolver #1 is an introduction to this genre done right. With dynamic art and choreography, this issue introduces a brand new Danger Girl storyline lacking any dull moments. From the second this issue started it demanded the reader’s attention.

...continue reading »
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