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Geek Gear: Final Fantasy XIII Meets The Dark Knight In ‘Lightning Returns’
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Final Fantasy XIII Meets The Dark Knight In Lightning Returns

The $11 t-shirt deal of the day over at TeeFury today is a mash-up of Final Fantasy XIII and the Batman graphic novel The Dark Knight Returns that features glow-in-the-dark ink by Six Eyed Monster.

The sale began at Teefury today, Saturday, February 22, 2014, at midnight EST, and will continue for 24 hours from then, and once it’s over, it will not be sold on the site for $11 anymore, though it will continue into the next day for $14 (look for the After Hours bar at the top).

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Holiday Geek Gift Guide 2012: Batman Edition
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Hunter Camp   |  
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Holiday Geek Gift Guide: Batman

The city calm, and the night is dark, but there’s a gloom on the horizon of the newly fallen snow. It’s with this that you realize that there are very few shopping days left until the holidays are over. Well, chances are you’ve got a Batman fan in your life on some level whether they be hardcore fans, new comers or simply a casual gent or lady that enjoys the movies. Well, have I got some last minute, easy as pecan pie solutions for you! Below are several gift ideas that can be presented to your loved ones. One thing that should be mentioned about the below list is that pretty much nothing needs deep understanding of the character’s history. These are pretty safe gifts for any Batfan that you may know, no matter how hardcore. Anyway, let’s get on with this gift guide, shall we?

ABSOLUTE EDITIONS

The thing about Absolute Editions is that, even if I personally don’t like the story, I want the Absolute Edition. Does that make sense? Let me explain. Absolute Editions are presented in the giant hardcover that basically is the same size as the original art, but it’s completely colored and printed on extremely high quality paper. So, any imaginable detail in the art can be experienced, and usually only the most high profile stories with incredibly talented creative teams get the Absolute treatment. Plus, in these editions, there are loads of bonus features that liken them to the most ultimate editions of movie releases. So, with that, let’s move on to the two Batman specific ones on this list.

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NYCC 2012: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 2 Panel
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NYCC 2012: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 2 Panel - Bruce Timm

Attendees at the Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 2 panel at the IGN Theater in the Jacob Javits Convention Center at the New York Comic-Con on Saturday got a sneak peek at the epic animated conclusion to Frank Miller’s story featuring Gotham City’s Caped Crusader.

Moderator Gary Miereanu introduced long-time DC Animated producers: multiple Emmy Award winner, voice and dialogue director Andrea Romano, along with as called by Miereanu, “the architect of superhero animation” Bruce Timm. To the crowd’s delight, intros were immediately followed by a trailer of the upcoming sequel to Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 1.

Another clip was shown which featured the Joker on a talk show, in which the host was voiced by Conan O’Brien. At first the footage was campy, then turned rather sinister as the Joker manifested his controlled viciousness.

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The Evolution Of Batman In Popular Culture
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Hunter Camp   |  
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Batman in Popular Culture

Batman has become one of, if not the most well known characters in the history of American pop culture. He’s been dark, he’s been bright, and he’s even been an agent of propaganda, but one thing that has remained consistent is that people know who Batman is. With The Evolution of Batman in Popular Culture, my attempt is to take an extensive look at all the ways that Batman can be interpreted, why he’s remained a consistent force in popular culture, and how he becomes a reflection of society making him the most iconic superhero.

When Batman (Bat-Man) was created by Bill Finger and Robert Kane, he was initially created as an answer to Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s iconic superhero of the lower class. And while Superman was given super powers and a fighting stance against corruption, Batman was a little darker. The creation of Batman came mainly from pulp novels, Zorro, and the 1926 horror film The Bat. Batman was a weird creature of the night that, initially, wasn’t afraid to kill and would do so if the criminal “deserved” it. In his creation, Batman is already a reflection of an era that is commonly described as being hopeful, yet disillusioned in the face of World War II, a time when almost everyone was on board with the Allied Powers in their war against the Evil Axis Powers. Society was cut and dry, good and bad, so a four-color look at a wealthy vigilante lent itself perfectly to the culture of the time.

Furthermore, this interpretation of The Batman was moved into the popular propaganda films shown during war times where Batman and Robin teamed up to fight on the home front while all the soldiers were defending America’s freedom. Sure, if you try to watch The Batman and the Batman and Robin serials, you’re going to lose your mind if you’re brain’s not stuck in a World War II mindset in which you’re pretty much sure that Japanese people are completely evil and should be punished for all their evil deeds. Yes, it’s completely ridiculous and completely wrong, but it is 100% an accurate portrayal of the United States’ attitude toward the world at the time. Another aspect of this that’s worth mentioning is that in most superhero stories, this was the interpretation. In fact, this was the interpretation of most movie serials during the time period, but for the sake of argument, even as an overweight “on-a-budget” looking Batman, the interpretation is valid and represents the time.

The next major incarnation of The Caped Crusader came with “The New Look” that accompanied the heralding in of The Silver Age of comics. Oddly enough, with sales of superhero comics tanking, the introduction of the Batman TV show came to our Earth and showed a completely different side of Batman. This Batman was campy, this Batman was fun, this Batman was kid friendly, and above all else, this Batman was psychedelic. If one thing is tied to the 1960s, whether accurately or not, it’s the free love, acid freak hippie nature of society at the time. This youth culture was high on life and many other things which made straight-laced stiffs, like Adam West’s portrayal of the Batman character, completely hilarious. While kids were loving the cartoony action of Batman, the elaborate death traps created by brilliantly acted villains like The Riddler, The Joker, King Tut, and Egg Head, adults saw the humor that laced every other moment outside of the square Adam West. The cast was in on the joke, the adults were in on the joke, the only ones that were left out were the kids. And quite honestly, as a kid who watched this show growing up, it was absolutely perfect. All of the elements that are over done and goofy to me as an adult, which I still adore, were exactly what my child-like mind thought a superhero TV show about Batman should be like. The goofy, post-Wertham nature of The Silver Age in comics, alongside the ironic attitude of the country allowed Batman to be one of the biggest pop culture icons of the pre-Vietnam 1960s. Most today would refuse to admit the importance of this era of Batman, but when you take a grander look at his history, Batman reflects society, and that exactly what happened with Batman ’66.

Following the escapades of Adam West’s Batman, the titular character was relegated mostly to cartoon shows with interactions between other Warner properties like Scooby-Doo. Sure there was the live-action special Legends of The Superheroes which showed a handful of DC heroes fighting DC villains, but for the most part, while Batman was being redefined in the comics throughout the 70s, Batman for better or worse became a cartoon character. He stayed in the minds of children and parents until the 1980s when Frank Miller got a hold of him. In Miller’s The Dark Knight, he redefined what a superhero comic book could do, and alongside Alan Moore’s Watchmen, he changed comic books forever. Miller, as a writer, creates stories with hardboiled toughs in an incredibly dark setting, and after this version of Batman was brought to the attention of the masses again for the first time since the 1940s/1950s, Batman was once again The Dark Knight. This next step in Batman’s evolution led to filmmaker Tim Burton‘s 1989 Batman.

Batman was the next big superhero movie after the Superman franchise took off and then ultimately fell off due to poor writing/directing/producing/lack of public interest. After the boom and economic hopefulness of the 1980s, we were met with the grunge era. The grunge era, as I’m calling it, accompanied musical acts like Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Pearl Jam, The Pixies, and The Melvins, and was a sign of America’s youth caught up in a wave of disillusionment. Gone was the chrome horizon of the 1980s. What we were welcomed with, and on a path towards, was a somewhat dark era in which many felt ostracized and hopeless. It’s my opinion that 1989’s Batman helped usher in that time period, but either way, it’s hard to deny that Tim Burton’s cartoony gothic hero was not in part a reflection of that mood. When Batman hit theaters, fans saw a new Batman dressed all in black whose motivation once again became vengeance on the part of his parents’ murder. The gothic hero was an orphan on a grand scale, and considering the attitude of America’s teens at the time, people flocked to this interpretation. In fact, Batman stayed on track with Burton for quite some time, which included the debut of Batman: The Animated Series, which many young kids used as their first exposure to The Dark Knight and in the future, this series would become incredibly important, but we’ll get back to that in just a little bit when we discuss the modern era. This truly was a renaissance for The Batman.

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Batman 101: A Beginner’s Guide To The Dark Knight
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Hunter Camp   |  
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Batman 101

A lot of sites are probably putting together several lists right about now in honor of this Friday’s release of The Dark Knight Rises that would name most of these as “must-reads if you’re wanting to get into Batman comics,” or something to that effect. But how I’d like to phrase this entry is in more of an academic sense. These books that I’m about to suggest to you are being referred to as “Read these first” because a lot of the more “higher learning” readings require a sophisticated palette that must be developed by learning the different takes on the character of Batman prior to jumping shoulders’ deep into the complex and clever stories of these more advanced works.

Now, that’s not to say that any of the comics listed are bad. Sure I may not like some of them as much as others, but based on my research and personal experiences, the comics listed here in Batman 101 are some of the books that have gotten most hardcore Batman fans to start loving the character in the same way I do. Keep in mind that this is a list of comic books, so you’ll look elsewhere to see things like Batman ’66 and Batman: The Animated Series. So, if you’re ready, let’s get started with something I like to call Batman 101: A Beginner’s Guide To The Dark Knight.

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Check Out This Sneak Preview Of The ‘Batman: The Dark Knight Returns’ Animated Movie
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Batman: The Dark Knight Returns

A few weeks ago Warner Bros. and DC Comics Premiere Movies formerly announced the voice cast for their upcoming two-part direct-to-video animated adaptation of the classic 1986 DC miniseries Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, one of the most popular and influential Batman stories ever created and a cornerstone of the revisionist superhero comic movement that took shape in the late 1980s.

Warner and DC have included a special 13-minute preview of The Dark Knight Returns in the supplementary features on their latest DTV animated offering Superman Vs. The Elite. You can check out the preview here below.

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‘Batman: The Dark Knight Returns’ Voice Cast Announced; Plus Images From The Film
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Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns

Around the time that the forthcoming The Dark Knight Rises went into pre-production, Warner Bros. and the newly rechristened DC Comics Premiere Movies (formerly DC Universe Animated Original Movies) announced that the next two direct-to-video animated features starring Batman would be based on two of the greatest stories of the Caped Crusader ever told. Late last year Batman: Year One made its debut and was greeted with warm praise from critics and fans who had been apprehensive about how the classic comic book miniseries would translate to animated movie form. The second of the two Batman animated projects is by far the most eagerly-anticipated of the DTV Bat-films, considering that it is an adaptation of what is routinely referred to as the greatest Batman tale of them all.

The Dark Knight Returns, the groundbreaking 1986 miniseries that took Batman in a bold and startling new direction and became one of the hallmarks of modern comic book storytelling, will provide the basis for the next animated Batman movie. The original series took place in the future where an aging Bruce Wayne, now 55 years old, emerges from retirement as Batman to rescue Gotham from the clutches of a rampaging street gang called the Mutants. Soon not only does he find himself battling crazed punks, but also the supposedly rehabilitated Harvey Dent, his oldest archenemy the Joker, and even his longtime ally Superman, now an agent for the U.S. government.

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Frank Miller’s ‘The Dark Knight’ Auction To Benefit CBLDF
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Hunter Camp   |  
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CBLDF The Dark Knight Auction

The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is currently holding an auction for a signed artist proof copy of Frank Miller‘s 1986 genre-defining The Dark Knight, also known as The Dark Knight Returns.

This edition of The Dark Knight Returns, published by DC Comics and Graphitti Studios, was limited to 4,000 copies. I cannot express how truly rare this is, and as a Batman and Frank Miller fan, this is one version of this book that I’m dying to get my hands on. It has long been out of print, as you can currently only purchase the book in the paperback or Absolute formats. So collectors, get your PayPal accounts ready. You’re going to want to take a shot at this. I mean, just look at the signed Artist Proof Page.

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Frank Miller ‘Batman: Dark Knight Returns’ Art Expected To Fetch $100,000 At Auction
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Empress Eve   |  @   |  
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Batman & Robin art

Heritage Auctions will be auctioning off a piece of original art from Frank Miller and Klaus Janson‘s 1986 comic book series The Dark Knight Returns this May in New York City.

The auction house expects the art, which is the Batman and Robin splash page 10 from The Dark Knight Returns #3, to fetch over $100,000 at the event.

“This splash page, to my mind, is the single most memorable image from the entire book and the greatest image from the decade ever to come to market,” said Ed Jaster, Senior vice President of Heritage Auctions, “as well as one of the handful of most desirable pieces of original comic art from any era to come to market. This one has everything going for it and has already generated considerable buzz in collecting circles.”
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